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December 12, 2011

To Avoid Readmissions, Hospitals Trying Post-Discharge Clinics

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In recent years, hospitals have been under increasing pressure to keep their readmission rates low. The next bump in the road comes in October 2012, when Medicare will begin cutting back on reimbursement for facilities whose readmit rates are too high.

Hospitals are already hard at work at preventing readmissions due to preventable medical errors, which may not be reimbursed at all by Medicare at all. But it seems like they’re still far behind in the care coordination department.

In fact, research suggests that they’re facing an uphill battle, in part because patients often don’t get the kind of follow-up care they need.

In theory, fragile patients  should move smoothly from inpatient care to their PCP, ideally a medical home equipped to coordinate whatever follow-up care needs they have. Few primary care practices are up to speed yet, however.  In fact, some aren’t even sure when their patients are discharged.

How bad is the problem? According to one study quoted in The Hospitalist, only 42 percent of hospitalized Medicare patients had any contact with a primary care physician within 14 days of being discharged.

One solution to this problem might be a “post-discharge” or transitional care clinic offering primary care on or near a hospital’s campus, the article notes. This makes sense. After all, it’s more likely a patient will follow through and get follow-up care if it’s convenient to do so.

The idea behind these clinics isn’t to replace the patient’s existing PCP; instead, the clinic’s hospitalists, advance-practice nurses or PCPs are there to make sure patients absorbed their post-discharge instructions and are compliant with the meds prescribed during their stay.

Some hospitals have invested significant resources in building out transitional clinics, including Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Seattle-based Harborview Medical Center and Tallahassee (Fla.) Memorial Hospital, which partnered with a local health plan to kick off the effort.

That being said, the idea is a new one and few other hospitals have taken the plunge as of yet. It will be interesting to see whether this approach actually works, and particularly, whether one model of transitional care stands out.

P.S.  I’d particularly like to know whether hospitals can accomplish some of these objectives by monitoring patients remotely after they’re discharged. After attending last week’s mHealth show, I’m betting remote monitoring would be cheaper than setting up a new clinic. Can’t wait to see whether hospitals try that route!

 

 

 

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November 7, 2011

Hospital M&A Getting Tough (But Misguided) Scrutiny From Lawmakers

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As us in “the biz” know, the pace of hospital M&A isn’t going to slow down anytime soon. Hospitals are huddling together to scale up for countless reasons.

The reasons for hospital consolidation are just about unstoppable, of course, as they include  a) well-founded fears regarding reform, b) trouble carrying the capital capital costs involved in scaling up health IT infrastructure, c) long-term trends squeezing hospital margins and d) the need to participate effectively  in ACOs, HIEs and other alphabet soup organizations.

Unless the government takes over the entire healthcare system and spends these factors away, they’ll push execs into the arms of their peers regardless of what federal policies roll out.  Yes, the FTC can put mergers on hold, and notably, has gone medieval on a few mergers just to prove it can, but let’s not pretend it has the resources to slow hospital consolidation dealflow much either.

So, I must say I was sort of amused to learn that members of the  House Ways and Means Subcommittee on Health took a  stern look at hospital dealmaking and consolidation last month.  You know, to me it’s like standing in a flooded basement in a rainstorm and focusing on a few cracks in the wall — but I digress.

At the hearing, an economics and health policy professor named Martin Gaynor testified that consolidation was picking up speed. He also asserted that studies show hospital prices going up meaningfully whenever hospital markets consolidate.

Geez, Professor Gaynor, you say that like it’s a bad thing! Doesn’t classical economics allow for the supply side folks to work together too, without breaking the system? Whoops, I digress again.

The hearing, which took place in September, also included data from a Rand Corp. study noting that health plans were consolidating dramatically, and that these mergers were giving health plans too much power.  (Wow, imagine that — health plans having too much power?)

Oh, Lord, why does all of this seem beside the point?  Well, probably because it’s not going to help anyone.  Sure, knowing  what impact hospital M&A is having is part of a well-informed Health Subcommittee’s job description.  And I appreciate that the Subcommittee is trying to look at the bigger picture, one which includes both health insurers and hospitals.

But hearings like this, which assume that pricing indicators are the best way to decide whether the public good is being served, strike me as painfully uninformed. While I’m no economist, I have seen a few deals come and go, and some ill-considered attempts to control dealflow too. After following the health market for decades, I’m convinced that playing Whack-A-Mole and slapping down those “bad guys” who are overcharging/underpaying gets us nowhere.

 

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November 21, 2010

So many blank spots on the clinical data map!

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Emergency medical technicians evacuating an in...

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EMTs collect a lot of data on their trip to the emergency department — and usually, data treating ED physicians will want pretty badly when they see the patient. But in virtually every case, most of that critical info transfer takes place on paper or in a hurried conversation amidst much noise and distraction.

Community medical centers collect as much data on patients as private primary care practices do,  but how often are they connected with hospitals — even those that have done a big ambulatory EMR rollout?

And what about blood banks?   Independent clinical labs like LabCorp.?  School medical offices?  Is anyone paying attention to their data, or is it just being ignored?

Look, I don’t mean to be a dunce here. It’s not as though hospitals and medical practices are sitting around buffing their nails and waiting for something to happen, data-connection wise.

But it’s worth remembering, despite the labor involved in hooking up hospitals and primary care practices, that there are data leakage everywhere.  Until we look the flow of data more wholistically, whole workflows will be designed as though such relationships didn’t even exist — and that’s a Bad Thing.

I say, start with the EMT data, as it’s the closest to the point of care, but regardless of how you expand your clinical data source map, expand it. Otherwise, you’ll be left with a nasty information design problem and finding a workaround will be a nighmare.  Think about it.

(This editorial’s content draws on a speech given by Vivian Funkhouser of  Motorola at a trade show held last week by Everything Channel.)

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